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New building boosts medical research Prime Minister Tony Abbot and Premier of New South Wales, Mike Baird open the new WMI building

A state-of-the-art, $110 million, medical research centre has been officially opened in Western Sydney by the Prime Minister, Tony Abbott and Premier of New South Wales, Mike Baird.

The new Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research building brings together almost 400 clinicians, scientists, postgraduate students and support staff with the aim of accelerating research into Australia’s major health problems and translating its outcomes into new diagnostics, prognostics, preventions, therapies and cures. Click here for more information.

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We are proudly affiliated with the University of Sydney.

First test for increased liver disease risk

Professor Jacob George, Westmead Millennium Institute

An international research group led by scientists at the Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research, in developing the first genetic predictor test for liver disease, has discovered a way to determine why some patients develop rapid liver scarring (fibrosis) while others do not.

The risk of fibrosis progression is determined to a great extent by an individual’s genetic makeup. This genetic test will help doctors tell patients with any type of liver disease if they have an increased risk of developing life-threatening liver scarring.
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WMI researchers collaborate on a new drug that tricks the body into losing weight

Scientists at Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research (WMI) have contributed to the development of an entirely new type of pill that tricks the body into thinking it has consumed calories, causing it to burn fat.

Research published in Nature Medicine, shows that the pill is effective in stopping weight gain, lowering cholesterol, controlling blood sugar and minimising inflammation. And because the drug, called fexaramine, acts in the intestine and is not absorbed into the blood, it is expected to cause fewer side effects in humans than other diet pills. 
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